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The Imperial Baths

One look at the monumental beauty of the Imperial Baths’ window arcades is enough to tell you that those who once lay in the hot-water pools here sure knew how to live. Bathing during imperial times had long ceased to be merely about cleaning the body. It was about otium, leisure. And there was plenty of that at the baths.

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People could spend yours in the 40-degree waters of the caldarium, rewarded with a view of the Petrisberg’s hills. They would be oiled and massaged by slaves, or have cold water poured over them in the cold-water bath as they sat enthroned on marble armchairs. They would indulge in ball games, meet with friends and business partners, relax, laugh and sweat. And of course forget about all their troubles, which would otherwise have cast a shadow over their uninterrupted recreation. So it was that the baths’ staff had to share the underground passageways – down which they would silently scamper from A to B to perform their work – with the dirty water of the pools and toilet facilities.
These passageways can still be seen today, as can the remains of the sewage system and the homes of the wealthy, which had to be demolished to build the baths. The circular imprint of a Roman master builder has even been preserved. Above ground, you can re-enact the typical bathing process which, we must unfortunately admit, no Roman imperial confidant ever performed. Because the large-scale construction project was sadly not finished in its originally planned size.

A must for: Idlers. Subterranean explorers. Engineering enthusiasts. Water rats and wellness fans.

UNESCO World Heritage Site: 100%
Echo: 5% (above ground), 50% (below ground)
Cellar vibe: 50%

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    Trier, Kaiserthermen-Steig 1

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Opening hours

Message from March 16, 2020, 6.10 p.m.:
"The museums, institutions and properties managed by the Generaldirektion Kulturelles Erbe (GDKE) Rheinland-Pfalz are closed to the public for the time being. This includes: Rhineland Federal State Museum (Rheinisches Landesmuseum Trier) / Roman buildings in Trier".

Regular:

April - September: daily, 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
October and March: daily, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
November - February: daily, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
 

Note:
Last admission 30 minutes before closing.

Admission prices

Adults: € 4.00
Adults with reduced price*: € 3.00
Children and pupils (6-18 Jahre): € 2.50
Children up to age 6: free entrance

Family ticket 1**: € 4,00, every additional child: € 0.50
Family ticket 2***: € 8,00, every additional child: € 0.50
Groups of 10 or more adults **** (ab 10 Personen): € 3.50
Groups of 10 or more Children / teenagers (up to 18 years )****: € 2.00


* Pupils over 18, students, trainees, persons doing community service, seniors, unemployed, handicapped people – after presentation of the certificate of entitlement.
** One adult, up to four children up to age 18
*** Two adults, up to four children up to age 18
**** Group tickets must be purchased by one person (guide, supervisor).



Combined tickets
With the Trier Antiquity Card, you can discover the center of ancient times easily and inexpensively.
Three different versions offer you admission to the Trier Roman monuments as well as additional reductions all around ancient Trier.

The Imperial Baths

Kaiserthermen
Weberbach 41
54290 Trier
Tel. +49 (0) 651 4362-550
www.zentrum-der-antike.de/en.html

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